Adopting A Shelter Dog – Make A Friend For Life!


Puppy in a chage at the animal shelter waiting to be adopted

Puppy in a cage at the animal shelter waiting to be adopted

If you are looking for a new or 2nd pet, consider getting a shelter dog.  These wonderful animals are typically fully vetted and sterilised and make great pets.

Most shelter staffs will be able to tell you about the dog’s personality and if they are good with children, cats, or other dogs. 

Shelter dogs are not bad dogs, contrary to what  you might have read. 

They are dogs who have been abandoned or tossed away and are just looking for a good home.  Most of the time, when you adopt a shelter dog, you will find a loving companion.

Many shelters today are no-kill shelters which means they do not euthanasia healthy animals. These are wonderful programs where staff work with each dog, providing them attention, training, and health checks. Unfortunately, there are still some shelters which do euthanasia if a dog is not adopted within a certain period of time. 

There is no good reason for this, other than economics, but is still happens.  It does take a great deal of work on the shelter’s part to find new homes for all of their animals.

These dedicated shelter workers advertise online, in the local paper and media and hold adoption events every weekend.  

Most shelters rely on volunteers to keep their doors open and will train their volunteers in how to handle scared or angry dogs or other animals. 

Volunteers also take care of cleaning kennels, helping with vetting, and working with clients who are interested in adopting.  While there may be one or two paid staff at a shelter, most of the work is done by dedicated volunteers.

Some shelters are funded with a combination of government, private and grant funding, but many rely on private donations and grants. When you adopt a shelter dog, you will probably be asked to pay a small fee.  This money helps offset the costs of preparing a dog for adoption.

Many shelter dogs are brought into the shelter in poor health and need a great deal of veterinary care before they can be placed for adoption. 

Most must be sterilised, at a minimum and then given all their required immunisations. Some must be wormed and defleaed and may also have respiratory or other illnesses which must be treated.

Many veterinarians will donate time to help with shelter dogs and other animals, but even they must be paid if a dog requires surgery or long-term treatment. 

This is why so many shelters hold fundraising events and work hard to get their name and their mission in front of the public. 

Many shelters will hold special fundraising drives to raise money for medical care for a specific shelter dog or other animal. 

If these drives are not successful, they may lose that animal since they cannot pay for the care it needs to keep it healthy.  

Donating time and money to a shelter is a great way to give back to your community.

You can donate just a few hours a week and just a few dollars and make a great deal of difference in the life of a shelter dog.




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